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Redemption of the Beast ★★★✩✩

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Title: Redemption of the Beast: Outside the City 3

Author: Amylea Lyn

Genre: m/m paranormal romance

Print length: 173 pages

Publication date: February 23, 2013

Rating: Three Stars

Blurb: Micah Sanders has been in love with the Warrior, Sashan, since he was a boy. But the strong, quiet Katrian shies away from him, making Micah believe his weak body and childhood illnesses are keeping them apart.

Sashan is a troubled Katrian who has lost his way. Emotionally scarred, he hides from the world and the one man who could complete him, feeling unworthy of his mate.

When Micah is kidnapped, will Sashan find the strength to rescue his mate, discover what the City plans next for the Katrian people, and learn who the monstrous traitor is behind all their troubles? Most importantly, will a seemingly unworthy Beast finally find the redemption he seeks in the arms of his love?

Review: 
I had originally intended to give this book only two stars. However, it is a third book from the ‘Outside the City’ collection. Considering that I haven’t read the first two, my dissatisfaction with the poor presentation of all the supporting characters can be canceled out. I will give the writer some credit and assume that they’ve been properly dealt with in the first two novels.
I will start with the positive end of my review. The created world, I believe, has an incredible potential. The City is intriguing, the Outside world even more so. Perhaps the idea is not the most original one, but it comes off fresh and new.
The plot has a few faults (I knew who the bad guy was long before the end of the novel) but it’s definitely a better thought out plot than most Nora Roberts fiction. If it all seems a bit convenient, it doesn’t actually harm the story. After all, a lot of readers prefer a convenient plot. Especially when they’re looking for a light read.
What harms the story is a combination of things.
The dialogue. I hate to say it’s terrible but that’s the first word that comes to mind. Some sentence structure is so jarring that you’re continuously propelled out of the story. “He hit me, beating me as he spouted off the City’s propaganda that it pushes into its citizen’s heads before they even start walking.” Sometimes, a writer is so afraid of too many ‘ands’ that he/she will avoid them at all costs. Unfortunately, the end result is just a butchered sentence.
The emotion. It’s so extreme that by the end of the novel, you’re mostly numb to it. We’re told, in excruciating detail, how each character feels at every given moment. Combine that with each of them being strapped to the world’s most unstable emotional roller coaster and you have a recipe for nausea.
In addition, the use of the word ‘mate’ drove me crazy. It was so frequent in so many unnecessary places that the main characters were starting to sound Australian.
I won’t go on to sex and grammatical mistakes and many other things I disliked. Some readers have no issues overlooking grammatical mistakes as long as they like the story (and there really was only a few; nothing really bad). The sex, on the other hand, is subjective; we all have different expectations and different preferences.
What bothered me the most, in the end, was the potential that was wasted here. To have such an imaginative world and yet such a poorly written book about it. If this writer ever does a collaboration with an author who can provide the skills she is missing, I would be the first person to buy their work. Until then though, I’m sorry to say, her work is just not for me.
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